The Vacation Rental Technology Ecosystem

by Jason Q. Freed + Skift Team - Jul 2015

Skift Research Take

With technology innovation and a thriving online distribution landscape, vacation rental owners are taking their businesses to new heights. Homeowners and property managers are more astute in digital marketing, by developing their own websites and managing calendars on billion-dollar distribution sites. Technology is revolutionizing the vacation rental at a multitude of touchpoints.

Report Overview

Executive summary

Riding rapid technology advances, vacation rental owners today are in a position to market their properties to a global audience and manage their rental space as efficiently as ever.

Software has helped distribution companies become more efficient, getting product to the traveler faster. Similarly, rental owners have many choices for marketing their properties thanks to tech innovations.

More recently, technology providers have begun arming rental owners with advanced channel management capabilities, letting owners fill vacant nights at optimal prices. Channel management tools give properties more exposure and increase the ability to maximize rental earnings. As the number of channels grows, owners can use these tools to synchronize property content, prices and availability.

A big value proposition for partnering with a vacation rental distribution partner is reaping the benefits of a modern, fast and content-rich website. The best sites are evolving their search engines to best match guests and hosts based on their respective needs. The sites are giving searchers more accurate results that are close to exactly what they’re looking for; and conversely ensuring hosts are receiving requests from guests that fit their wants.

The booming vacation rental industry is attracting innovative solutions providers. Beyond the evolution technology has brought to selling, marketing and distributing rental properties, third-party suppliers are also innovating at a variety of rental-property touchpoints.

This Skift Trends Report will identify some of the largest tech players in the vacation rental space as well as illustrate the potential for a massive evolution in how and where people vacation.

Executive summary

Riding rapid technology advances, vacation rental owners today are in a position to market their properties to a global audience and manage their rental space as efficiently as ever.

Software has helped distribution companies become more efficient, getting product to the traveler faster. Similarly, rental owners have many choices for marketing their properties thanks to tech innovations.

More recently, technology providers have begun arming rental owners with advanced channel management capabilities, letting owners fill vacant nights at optimal prices. Channel management tools give properties more exposure and increase the ability to maximize rental earnings. As the number of channels grows, owners can use these tools to synchronize property content, prices and availability.

A big value proposition for partnering with a vacation rental distribution partner is reaping the benefits of a modern, fast and content-rich website. The best sites are evolving their search engines to best match guests and hosts based on their respective needs. The sites are giving searchers more accurate results that are close to exactly what they’re looking for; and conversely ensuring hosts are receiving requests from guests that fit their wants.

The booming vacation rental industry is attracting innovative solutions providers. Beyond the evolution technology has brought to selling, marketing and distributing rental properties, third-party suppliers are also innovating at a variety of rental-property touchpoints.

This Skift Trends Report will identify some of the largest tech players in the vacation rental space as well as illustrate the potential for a massive evolution in how and where people vacation.

Introduction

Rising income, driven by a strong employment market, suggests more Americans are planning a summer vacation than any year since 2007.

The vacation rental industry couldn’t be more ready. In the past five years, finding, booking and paying for a vacation rental property—whether it’s a treehouse in Austin or a penthouse in Santa Monica—has become drastically more efficient. Technology innovations are pushing the industry forward at rapid speed, and rental homeowners, property managers and travelers are benefitting.

Travelers now have content-rich, user-friendly digital platforms to search and compare available rental properties. Connecting guests and hosts has become nearly immediate, and on-property innovations are assisting both parties.

Technology is powering a vacation rental industry surge

The year was 2007—just eight short years ago—when San Francisco roommates Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia were low on rent and pondered how they could make ends meet. The two came up with the idea of turning their living room into a bed and breakfast, accommodating three guests on air mattresses and providing a homemade breakfast.

It worked. So much so that the budding hosts began discussing a concept dubbed “AirBed & Breakfast,” which would connect budget travelers to people willing to share a bit of their space for rent money. Launched in August 2008, Airbedandbreakfast.com grew quickly, expanding to include “properties” anywhere from living room couches to entire apartments and homes.

Chesky and Gebbia weren’t the first to bring vacation rental properties to the Internet, but they recognized a gap in the market: Travelers were without a content-rich, user-friendly digital platform to search and compare available rental properties and connect immediately with a host.

The two shortened Airbedandbreakfast.com to Airbnb.com in 2009. Its launch did more than give backpackers a place to crash; it proved that using innovations in technology to connect renters with rental owners was big business. At that time, the vacation rental marketplace was valued at $24 billion, according to Phocuswright. For some context, June 2015, when Airbnb alone closed a $1 billion funding round that valued the company at $24 billion.

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Booking software helped early vacation rental owners market their properties to a much wider audience. It wasn’t long before the vacation rental industry became a legitimate alternative to staying in a hotel.

By 2012, The New York Times was publishing lists of the biggest online vacation rental sites, including early players HomeAway, Roomorama, VRBO and TripAdvisor, as well as Airbnb. Hotel distribution partners quickly took notice, and by 2014 online travel giant Expedia had began partnering with smaller vacation rental sites to give their listings even greater distribution. 1

Fast-forward to the first quarter of 2015. Priceline’s vacation rental count reached 275,000, representing a million rentable units. Airbnb continues to ramp up its vacation rentals business, and HomeAway still dominates the market for listings from owners of second homes.

With the help of tech advances, including these distribution partners, vacation rental owners are more astute at digital marketing, able to develop their own websites and manage calendars on billion-dollar distribution sites. Across the globe, the adoption of technology platforms remains on the rise as vacation-rental management companies relinquish antiquated, offline business practices and opt for a more efficient online approach. Beyond distribution, technology is revolutionizing the vacation rental at a multitude of touchpoints.

Vacation rental owners as “channel managers”

Just as the use of software has helped distribution companies become more efficient, getting product to the traveler faster, innovations in technology today provide rental owners with many choices when it comes to marketing their properties.

“Online, digital marketing has become a necessary and primary focus for vacation rental managers,” says Edwards, who also is president of the executive committee for the Vacation Rental Manager’s Association. “We’re also seeing a shift in the distribution space, where certain distribution partners have become more valuable, while others less.” – Ben Edwards, business development manager for Newman-Dailey Resort Properties and president of the executive committee for the Vacation Rental Manager’s Association

Still, some owners choose to go it alone. According to data from HomeAway, the average do-it-yourselfer spends nine hours a week managing her vacation rental. It’s a major time commitment, but handling everything directly can minimize expenses. Alternatively, owners can choose to use a property manager, which alleviates much of the work but charge considerable commission rates—up to 50 percent in some cases. Yet another option is paying a third-party company to market and book a space.

Ben Edwards, a vacation rental manager who oversees business development for Newman-Dailey Resort Properties, says vacation rental managers’ sales and marketing plans have changed dramatically.

“Online, digital marketing has become a necessary and primary focus for vacation rental managers,” says Edwards, who also is president of the executive committee for the Vacation Rental Manager’s Association. “We’re also seeing a shift in the distribution space, where certain distribution partners have become more valuable, while others less.”

He says a company’s website is it’s most valuable technology.

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“In today’s market, it is imperative to have a robust, well-managed and progressive digital strategy to attract guests and owners alike,” Edwards says.

Rental owners consider several factors when determining where and how to advertise their home. Often, owners are looking for an established and trusted platform.

“In today’s market, it is imperative to have a robust, well-managed and progressive digital strategy to attract guests and owners alike.” – Ben Edwards, business development manager for Newman-Dailey Resort Properties and president of the executive committee for the Vacation Rental Manager’s Association

“Another important factor is the return on investment for a listing,” says Jeff Hurst, chief strategy officer at HomeAway. Hurst said the average owner on HomeAway grosses $28,000 in annual income by renting an average of 18 weeks per year.

“That amount is enough for more than half of the owners to cover 75% or more of their mortgage from rental income,” he said.

More recently, technology providers have begun arming rental owners with advanced channel management capabilities, giving owners the ability to fill vacant nights at optimal prices. Channel management tools give properties more exposure and increase the ability to maximize rental earnings. As the number of channels grows, owners can use these tools to synchronize property content, prices and availability.

For example, Kigo, one of the industry’s fastest-growing platforms, lets rental managers and portal customers share inventory. That allows for partnering and lets homeowners book each other’s properties in real-time. The site is able to sync prices, availability and content across its entire system. CEO Shawn Convery told the Vacation Rental Marketing Blog that Kigo “lets our customers build a vacation rental travel-agent-like personalized relationship with their guests and gain more revenue earning opportunities. On the other side, it lets those who are distributing units to gain access to more booking demand.” 2

Edwards says that with all the new innovation and available software, owners and managers want to have a measurable ROI.

“But sometimes that’s not always easy as certain qualitative software is difficult to calculate,” he says.

Homestay was founded in 2012 as a platform to assist with automating education travel, or students and teachers taking trips for the purposes of education.

CEO Alan Clarke says Homestay has a global appetite but is focused on providing a local experience. Most rental owners list their properties on multiple platforms, somewhere between three and nine, he guessed.

“It’s a market that is growing and I don’t think it has settled itself yet,” he says. “People probably (list on many sites) at the moment but they’ll eventually settle on a primary and secondary platform.”

He said each site has to have its own unique value proposition. Homestay, for example, is a site where most often the host is present during the stay. Other sites serve different customer needs.

“It’s partly about awareness, and as the level of awareness grows it will ultimately come down to the nature of the guest that is using that site,” Clarke says.

Laurel Greatrix, TripAdvisor’s senior manager of communications, says homeowners and property managers want to advertise their homes to the largest possible audience to maximize occupancy. Therefore, sites with larger global footprints can be appealing. A home listed through one of TripAdvisor’s vacation rental websites—namely FlipKey, Holiday Lettings, Niumba or Vacation Home Rentals—will be translated into multiple languages to appear on 25 TripAdvisor domains globally.

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With the help of in-house technology or third-party partners, a homeowner’s calendar is also almost always digital, cloud-based and updated in real time. A listing calendar lets travelers determine when the home is available and should be updated immediately to avoid double bookings. The Internet has allowed owners to easily research their competitors’ calendars to determine how often they are being booked.

HomeAway, like many of the larger players, has created sophisticated listing management tools that let owners update all elements of their listing from one dashboard, including detailed property descriptions, rental rates and calendar updates. If an owner advertises multiple properties, those changes are also managed from the same dashboard, which is especially helpful for property managers who manage hundreds of properties.

TripAdvisor has built out an “Owner Centre” where property managers and homeowners can manage everything in one place, from creating and updating their listings, to managing availability, processing payments and collecting reviews. The Owner Centre lets homeowners/property managers send quotes, accept booking requests and exchange messages with guests, as well as take payment from guests through TripAdvisor’s payment system. Availability calendars are linked to the online booking system and will automatically update to reflect booked dates.

Lastly, often overlooked is the power of big data, meaning the collection, availability and analysis of listing data and guest data available to owners. Listing analytics provide owners with powerful insights and the ability to track the performance of their listing, and are available through most booking sites.

Website innovation serves both guests and hosts

A big value proposition for partnering with a vacation rental distribution partner is reaping the benefits of a modern, fast and content-rich website. The best sites are evolving their search engines to best match guests and hosts based on their respective needs. They’re giving searchers more accurate results that are close to exactly what they’re looking for; and conversely ensuring hosts are receiving requests from guests that fit their wants.

The concept of matching and connectivity is essential to delivering a site’s value proposition.

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“The same way you’ve seen Booking.com evolve using social stimuli, those tools and techniques will be adopted into the search algorithms that are used on (vacation rental) sites,” says Clarke of HomeStay. “It’s only natural that as a platform’s understanding of host/guest gets better, the recommendations and matching capabilities will improve.”

Hurst said HomeAway is continually improving the way it matches travelers with vacation rentals, primarily through an algorithm that determines where properties are displayed in search results.

“By making their property online bookable, maintaining accurate calendars and rates, responding quickly and offering secure payment options, owners and property managers are providing a better overall experience, so HomeAway rewards that behavior by driving more travelers to those properties,” he says. “The features travelers value vary depending on geography, so the position of listings in search results varies across HomeAway sites accordingly.”

HomeAway places an emphasis on accurate locations and map-based search functionality, Hurst says.

For TripAdvisor, which lets travelers search through 700,000 properties, the goal is to surface only those that exactly match what they need. Users can search broadly by destination, dates and number of bedrooms, or focus on a specific set of needs. They can narrow search results by a certain amenity—such as a private pool, yard, parking or grill—or by a price range, a specific neighborhood within that destination, or even if they prefer to pay online.

For those who choose to avoid the mega distribution portals, search-engine optimization and search-engine marketing are helping bridge the gap. Many managers, under-equipped in SEO, still have a lot to gain in this area. SEO and SEM give renters the opportunity to make the most out of individual websites. They’re good long-term investments that help smaller properties diversify from over-dependence on distribution partners.

With a relatively simple SEO strategy, today’s vacation rental owners can tailor their site to a target audience by choosing the best keywords and phrases to focus on. There are many free SEO tools that help website owners see an overview of all their pages that have been indexed by search engines, and from there users can track performance metrics and tweak things like web address, page title and page meta description. Owners can review and edit page content to ensure it is thorough and clear.

Pricing and payment under the microscope

Nightly rates have the potential to make or break the performance of a vacation rental. If rates are too high or too complex, fewer travelers will book
the home. If rates are set too low, owners are likely to leave money on the table.

Most start the old-fashioned way by researching their competition, reviewing listings for similar properties to gauge how much the competition is charging.

Adjusting your rates based on traveler demand—often called dynamic pricing—is the best way to optimize rental income. For example, owners benefit from charging higher fees during peak season, holidays and weekends. In addition, most owners also offer discounted rates for longer stays. Technology partners can aid greatly in this process.

“It’s essential to be brilliant at pricing,” said HomeStay’s Clarke. “Over time, in a world of perfect information, platforms could and should make recommendations almost at a street level. There is no reason why marketplaces can’t help hosts determine their price. It’s incumbent on platforms to make it intuitive and easy.”

Then comes the trickiest part. Once a host has connected with a guest, it’s imperative that the host can offer safe and secure payment options.

HomeAway offers instant booking and payment processed internally, assuring secure payment arrival and automatically insuring that payment for up to $10,000. For homeowners or managers who take payment through TripAdvisor, the company will look after damage deposits, leaving enough time for the homeowner to report any damage and claim deposit money after the stay.

“It’s essential to be brilliant at pricing. Over time, in a world of perfect information, platforms could and should make recommendations almost at a street level. There is no reason why marketplaces can’t help hosts determine their price. It’s incumbent on platforms to make it intuitive and easy.” – Alan Clarke, CEO of Homestay

Vacation rental payment processing challenges have brought forth an emergence of companies offering horizontal needs to vertical platforms. Companies like WorldPay and MangoPay have been developed to solve payment challenges and now can provide payment solutions that can be deployed across any vertical.

“As the marketplace matures, entrepreneurs will find ways to create value for that ecosystem,” said Clarke.

One such company is SafelyStay, founded in 2012 with the goal of making peer-to-peer rentals as instantly bookable as a branded hotel. Andrew Bate, CEO of SafelyStay, says the Internet automatically creates a hurdle when it comes to trust between the homeowner and the guest. So his focus is on three key areas:

    • Real-time verification, which means checking global lists, terrorist watch lists and background checks for red flags such as felonies, relevant misdemeanors and sex offender listings. On top of that, SafelyStay collects an internal list of “bad guests,” such as people who bounced a check. The company is curating data from two major OTA players to contribute to this list.
    • Insurance. SafelyStay offers a primary insurance policy that covers $10,000 in damages up front and can cover as much as $1 million.
    • Payments, or more accurately, protecting guest from fraud. For example, if the description of the house does not meet expectations, SafelyStay will act as a middleman until they are able to guarantee the transaction is not fraudulent.

HomeAway encourages and rewards credit card acceptance as the fastest and most secure payment method. But Hurst knows that at times travelers prefer offline payments, so HomeAway is in the process of creating a secure offline payment option for customers.

On TripAdvisor, any property that is booked and paid for through its internal payment platform is automatically covered by what the company calls “Peace of Mind” protection. It means a traveler won’t be out of pocket should they encounter a problem with their booking, such as fraud or inability to access their rental.

Innovative mobile and social strategies emerge

Today, it’s imperative for homeowners or property managers to make their rentals easy to browse and book from a mobile device. Property managers need to capture bookings where the guests do their browsing, which is increasingly on mobile devices.

Serious players are offering mobile-responsive websites, and most all of the management of a vacation rental listing, including bookings and payments, can be done via a distribution company’s mobile app.

“Mobile is essential to any given vertical platform,” says Clarke of HomeStay. “It’s my understanding, at least in the U.K., that 50 percent of searches on Google occur on a mobile device. It’s unquestionably a platform for ease of use, speed of use and simplicity of use.”

person-holiday-vacation-bikini

Jerry Dischler, Vice President, Product Management, AdWords, recently confirmed in a blog post that “more Google searches take place on mobile devices than on computers in 10 countries, including the U.S. and Japan.” For Google, mobile queries include mobile browser-based searches and those coming from Google’s mobile search apps. Google groups tablets with desktops.
http://adwords.blogspot.com/2015/05/building-for-next-moment.html

HomeStay sees “a healthy bit” of traffic coming through on non-desktop platforms, Clarke said.

“What mobile does, it delivers a better customer experience because it reduces the time component. A host has to accept the guest request, but by putting it in the pocket it can reduce the time. Mobile is a platform both for discovery and conversion.” – Ben Edwards, business development manager for Newman-Dailey Resort Properties and president of the executive committee for the Vacation Rental Manager’s Association

Greatrix said mobile is a rapidly growing part of TripAdvisor’s business for both the traveler and homeowner/property manager. The company’s mobile app allows homeowners and property managers to respond to inquiries and take bookings on the go. It also offers a free text message alert system to make owners/managers aware as and when their action is required.

TripAdvisor Vacation Rentals is also available for the traveler on the TripAdvisor app, where travelers can narrow down their search just as easily on the app as they can on desktop. Then they can safely and securely pay through a protected payment system on mobile.

“We’re constantly testing and improving our mobile offering, just as we are on desktop, to ensure we’re offering the best possible product to all of our customers no matter what device they’re using,” Greatrix says.

HomeAway continues to aggressively invest in mobile with the goal of improving the owner and traveler experience, and ultimately conversion rates, Hurst says.

“We recently redesigned our app and continue to integrate partners like Uber and Instacart, and give owners the ability to provide guests with helpful information, such as Wi-Fi passwords, restaurant recommendations and gate codes,” he says. “It’s still early days, but mobile will be a key part of our mission to make the entire rental experience even better than staying in a hotel.”

On the social front, companies are capitalizing on the ability to market and distribute with social content through even more channels. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram provide a great way to reach relevant customers with pertinent messages, and can also provide a seamless way to engage with a community.

Travelers can create a HomeAway account using their Facebook profile and share their vacation experiences on the HomeAway Social Hub.

“You’re able to reach your community in a targeted way and engage in the broader conversation around travel,” says Clarke. “The value proposition of some of those social channels is different and the content has to be appropriate.”

In the end, technology has already had a major impact on the vacation rental booking process and has begun to assist in revolutionizing the guest experience. But there is plenty more innovation on the way. Soon, revenue management tools will help owners get a better look at their competitive set, which will help with automating pricing and availability. As the market continues to grow exponentially, pioneering companies will find ways to use technology to push the industry even further forward.

Opportunities to do more with tech

A booming vacation rental industry is attracting innovative solutions providers.

Beyond the evolution technology has brought to selling, marketing and distributing rental properties, third-party suppliers are also innovating at a variety of rental-property touchpoints.

HomeStay, for example, has built a video-calling product into its system so both the guest and host can have a better understanding of each other before the meet and greet. Other start-up companies are offering parts of these services to homeowners, from automating the key exchange process to fitting the rental with quality linens to checking the apartment upon departure of the guests.

Igloohome, born from a hackathon event last year and still in the fundraising process, integrates a smart-home solution to create a digital key and help manage energy controls. Advanced features include an occupancy sensor and a smart camera in front of house.

To implement igloohome, homeowners must first install a smart home device and then connect it to a property-management system. Igloohome then knows who booked the home and how long they will stay. They’ll install a new smart lock or configure an existing one, provided it integrates properly and follows ZigBee protocol.

From here, homeowners and guests can use igloohome’s mobile app to control the lock. Guests receive a PIN code via SMS or e-mail and can just touch their phone to the lock on the door.

“We can eliminate the key-exchange process but we do not aim to eliminate personal interaction,” said co-founder Walter Wang Yue.

Alan Clarke, CEO of Homestay, paints a picture where transportation, key exchange, housekeeping and food delivery are all integrated across a single platform.

“Different partnerships start to make obvious sense,” he says.

Outside of the management space, the HomeAway app integrates with service providers such as Uber for transportation, and Instacart for grocery delivery, for the convenience of the vacation rental guest. In addition to owner-provided recommendations, integration with Gogobot provides travelers with all the information necessary to plan every aspect of their trip.

“We’ll continue to explore ways to make finding, booking and staying in a vacation rental an even better experience than hotels,” says Jeff Hurst, chief strategy officer at HomeAway.

person-woman-apple-hotel

SafelyStay, launched with the goal of creasing trust between all parties involved in the vacation rental space, promises to reduce the amount of time between a request and an approval, particularly when both parties are working over mobile devices.

“Imagine you go to Booking.com and you complete your reservation in two minutes,” says SafelyStay CEO Andrew Bate. “It’s just part of what guests are expecting. If you were to add that process in just destroys the whole connection.”

On-demand cleaning startup Handy recently launched a hospitality service tailored for vacation rental hosts, according to TechCrunch. The new service lets vacation rental hosts book check-out cleanings and check-ins preparations, including providing “hotel-quality linens,” doing laundry, and offering key management.

Additional Handy services, such as handyman services, plumbers and electricians, can also be booked via its platform. 4

Ground-level insight

Q&A with Ben Edwards, business development manager for Newman-Dailey Resort Properties and president of the executive committee for the Vacation Rental Manager’s Association, who says local and invested relationships are paramount to the vacation rental business and sometimes clash with a hands-off, outsourced model.

Skift: Is vacation rental ownership a profitable venture?
Edwards: Yes, if operated in a business-like and financially responsible manner.

Skift: What are some examples of technology you use to market and operate rental properties today?
Edwards: Web-based software, trigger email systems and professional web development.

Skift: Is it possible to outsource pretty much everything involved in rental management (marketing, management) and still eke out a profit?
Edwards: Certain business models are able to navigate the market and operate a sustainable operation; however, local and invested relationships are paramount to the vacation rental business and sometimes clash with a hands-off, outsourced model.

Skift: What kind of data do you use to make your their decisions?
Edwards: There are a number of key performance indicators that we use to make revenue, sales and marketing decisions, but we also rely heavily on financial reporting to influence our decisions.

Skift: Would you say today’s guests are demanding more technology in their rental than ever before? What are the most popular requests?
Edwards: In the past, Millennials were the primary users of VR technology; however, today all demographics are desirous of technology that enhances the check-in process or helps to create a more memorable experience.

Skift: Does technology help you compete with other vacation rentals on the market?
Edwards: Absolutely. Progressive, web-based, well-built software provides a leg up on the competition.

Insights and strategies

Innovations in technology provide rental owners with help marketing their properties. Online, digital marketing has become a necessary and primary focus for vacation rental managers. Still, some owners choose to go it alone as handling everything directly can minimize expenses.

Each third-party vacation rental site has its own unique value proposition. Some sites specialize in rentals where the host is present during the stay, others list managed properties where the owner is never there. Different sites serve different customer needs.

The largest distribution sites have created sophisticated listing management tools. These tools let owners update all elements of their listing from one dashboard, including detailed property descriptions, rental rates and calendar updates. If an owner advertises multiple properties, those changes are also managed from the same dashboard.

Vacation rental distribution partners have built a modern, fast and content-rich websites. A clean and effective website is critical to a rental owner, and the resources available to the largest sites are hard to match. The best sites are evolving their search engines to best match guests and hosts based on their respective needs.

Endnotes and further reading

  1. Higgins, Michelle. “Surfing for a Vacation Rental,” New York Times (January 18, 2012). Retrieved at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/travel/vacation-rental-sites.html?_r=0
  2. Landau, Matt. “4 Vacation Rental Guru Predictions for 2014” Vacation Rental Marketing Blog. Retrieved at http://www.vacationrentalmarketingblog.com/4-gurus-predict-2014/
  3. Sterling, Greg. “It’s Official: Google Says More Searches Now On Mobile Than On Desktop,” SearchEngineLand.com (May 5, 2015). Retrieved at http://searchengineland.com/its-official-google-says-more-searches-now-on-mobile-than-on-desktop-220369
  4. Lomas, Natasha. “Handy Expands Its Vacation Rental Cleaning Service,” TechCrunch (May 19, 2015). Retrieved at http://techcrunch.com/2015/05/19/handy-expands-its-vacation-rental-cleaning-service/